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FXM said in December 14th, 2012 at 10:55 am

Great and informative article. I work in the neighborhood and have seen all the changes. It was a crime to close down OLG. The chapel was very special to many, many people(including myself).

I watched the conversion of St. Zita’s Convent (including the erasure of the stone tablet).

There are two additional remaining ‘Hispanic’ convents (one between 7th and 8th) and (another 6th and 7th) on 14th Street.

One positive note is the endless procession of devout Mexican nationals this past Wednesday evening arriving for the all night vigil to OLG. Families with many children on long walks from the subways with the requisite roses for decoration. It was truly moving.These are simple folk from rural areas of Mexico who are sincerely devoted to our Faith. I certainly cannot vouch for what is being passed on to these generations by way of the liturgy (one can only imagine) however it was heart warming to witness this devotion. St. Bernards is truly revitalized within the Mexican NYC community (and as my friends explain) it is becoming more of a pilgramage venue for the Mexican population since many have local parishes in their neighborhoodsthroughout the city.

It is better that it remains open since as you mention there in no one in that area that could care less about the Church.

Zephyrinus said in December 14th, 2012 at 11:00 am

Dear Stuart.

Thank you for a riveting Post.

One is torn between despair, tears, gratefulness.

Wonderful photography and most interesting history of New York Churches.

Grateful for the opportunity to read all about it, but the despair and tears remain.

More Prayers to Our Lady of Guadalupe, I suspect, are needed.

in Domino.

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