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FXM said in November 27th, 2013 at 10:08 am

Monstrosity! What a depressing and cold space to encounter Our Lord. The tabernacle appears to have gumdrops for ornamentation. Spellman (ever the conformist as you mention)got his just desserts over time. He chased Fr. Gommar Depauw and some trads out to Long Island, even going after their TLM being said in the Pan Am building at the time.

Thomas said in November 28th, 2013 at 9:26 am

Can you post some pictures of Cardinal Spellman inside this church during the dedication? It would be interesting to see such a traditional person in that time of upheaval and change in the Church.

mtn1584 said in December 4th, 2013 at 12:59 pm

As a retired NYC Police Officer, I attended daily mass at Epiphany when I was assigned to the Academy for a short time back in 2003. This was, and is one of the coldest, ugly, and uninviting Catholic Churches I have ever been in. The “Easter Island” looking statue of Christ is particularly disturbing. All done in the MISINTTERPRETAIONS of the “Spirit of Vatican II”….Almost fifty years later Catholics are waking up from this nightmare,and restoring churches to their former glory. In this case, they would have to knock the building down, and start over.
Sicerely,
M.Nicolosi

Mr.Jon said in October 5th, 2016 at 8:39 pm

What a beautiful example of mid 20th century ecclesiastical architecture. The bold statements mixed with tradition icons are striking now…50 years later. The older this church gets the better it will look. Those who can only worship in the past should look inward to what a sacred space is. It is not just one thing. Time marks all scared spaces and we must recognize 1964 for what it was and learn.

thirteen said in March 16th, 2017 at 8:06 am

I went to Epiphany School and was ten when the church burned down. (BTW the fire happened on 20 December 1963, not 29 December.) The pastor, Msgr. William J. Farricker, seemed determined to rebuild in a then-modern style, and brusquely dismissed any idea of rebuilding the church as-was. I don’t remember anybody really liking the new church, but it surely was different. By the way, that plaza (which used to be occupied by two small apartment buildings and some retail space) was supposed to have been turned into a nice garden, with fountains and plants and so on. Either they ran out of money or they ran out of will. While they’ve added to the plaza in the decades since the church opened, for many years it was nothing but empty space.

Stuart Chessman said in March 17th, 2017 at 12:02 am

Thanks for the correction of the date!

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